How not to cross a Washington State Ferry (Video)

A powerboat named Nap Tyme collided with a Washington State Ferry Sunday during a crossing situation on Puget Sound. The ferry Chetzemoka was en route from Point Defiance to Vashon Island when onlookers watched as Nap Tyme didn’t appear to know there was an issue while the ferry gave five blasts on her horn.

Fortunately, nobody was injured.

Read more at SeattleTimes.com and watch the video below (Warning: Strong language). Also, here’s a interesting interview with Jake Beattie from the Northwest Maritime Center and Bill Radke on KUOW about the collision.

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49 Responses to How not to cross a Washington State Ferry (Video)

  1. Dave December 8, 2016 at 8:33 am #

    At least he didn’t poop his pants when he got hit.

    • RJ Bennett December 9, 2016 at 11:01 am #

      You don’t know that…

  2. Mary Ann Kae December 7, 2016 at 3:00 pm #

    Perhaps a prudent unofficial rule of thumb for these circumstances would be, “if you must go toidy while single-handing in inland waters, stop making way, raise signal flag “Mike” if available”. I’ve looked at the video several times and can’t believe anyone would continue underway for so long at that speed while below decks.

    • andy December 8, 2016 at 2:44 am #

      Other fun flags that might be appropriate…

      if doing #1 fly. JW – I have sprung a leak

      If doing #2 fly MEG – bowels are regular.

      PP – keep well clear of me

      PS – you should not come any closer

      Of course as funny as flying some of these flags can be, they do no good without knowledge of what the mean. If someone doesn’t know the rules of the road, probably won’t know what the flags mean.

  3. Supertorqued December 7, 2016 at 11:34 am #

    Are you ok….? Seriously I would have way more bars words that’s i won’t repeat here. Needless to say we’d be having a very up close and personal chat at the docks.

  4. Rick December 7, 2016 at 11:03 am #

    My “rule”. Tonnage ultimately always has the right away”

  5. amy December 7, 2016 at 10:31 am #

    Must of been “napping”

  6. Shelly Rhynsburger December 7, 2016 at 12:26 am #

    KOMO 4 News said the nap tyme boat owner was in the boats restroom and never knew he was heading for the Ferry until they hit.

  7. Captain Timkona December 7, 2016 at 12:24 am #

    starboard. Starboard! STTAARRboard!!!!! SSTTAAARRBBBOOOOAARRRRD!

    Ahhh crap u dumbass. Im gonna knock udafkout when we get back to da harbor. Now pee in this little cup.

    BTW….you “Boater Safety Class” jackwagons are all a bunch of nimrods.

    Know the rules. Or get off MY ocean.

  8. Mike T December 6, 2016 at 9:49 pm #

    The Nap Tyme should have given way as the Ferry falls under rule number 4 which is vessels constrained by their draft.

    • andy December 7, 2016 at 1:10 am #

      Do you know the depth there? The draft of the ferry? The proper day shapes for a vessel constrained by her draft?

      The ferry was not constrained by her draft!

      • andy December 7, 2016 at 5:02 am #

        As a follow up:

        Depth about 60 feet or more.

        Draft of ferry. 11 feet.

  9. Don December 6, 2016 at 6:40 pm #

    I highly recommend the Flagship Maritime Captains Training in Tacoma. Time and money VERY well spent!!!

  10. andy December 6, 2016 at 2:00 pm #

    Under the Navigation Rules, commonly called the Rules of the Road.

    Nap Tyme was a power driven vessel under way. Rule 3(a)(b).

    Ferry was a power driven vessel under way. Rule 3(a)(b).

    Lets continue with Rule 18. Who must keep clear of Who:
    From the top of the list to the bottom who is the most privileged
    1) A vessel being overtaken
    2) A vessel not under command
    3) A vessel restricted in her ability to maneuver
    4) A vessel constrained by her draft
    5) A fishing vessel engaged in fishing (not a boat engaged in trolling boat, see Rule 3)
    6) Sailing vessel be propelled without use of machinery
    7) Power driven vessel
    8) Seaplanes
    9) overtaking vessel

    Nap Tyme was #7, a power driven vessel.
    Ferry wasn’t was also #7, a power driven vessel.
    Was the Ferry entitled to any special consideration due to any other rules?
    No. Rule 9, Narrow Channels, doesn’t apply
    Rule 10, Traffic Separation Schemes, does not apply
    Rule 13, overtaking, does not apply.

    So now we have two equal vessel meeting in a crossing situation. Under Rule 15, when two power driven vessels meet the vessel which has the other on her starboard side shall keep clear. The ferry obviously had Nap Tyme on her starboard. The ferry needed to keep clear!

    Nap Tyme is not exonerated. Under Rule 17, when it becomes clear that the actions of the give way vessel by her own maneuvers can’t avoid the collision the stand on vessel must take actions to best aid in avoiding the collision. Nap Tyme did not do this.

    This brings up Rule 5, Look Out. All vessels need to keep a look out. A look out need to see that which can be seen and hear that which can be heard. Saying you didn’t see it or you didn’t hear it doesn’t absolve you of your need to see and hear! Nap Tyme appears to have failed this.

    Under Rule 7 and 8, the Ferry did not make an accurate assessment of the danger of a collision. And, did not make any changes to course or speed in an “positive, made in ample time”.

    Neither vessel followed all the rules, both bear some responsibility.

    • andy December 6, 2016 at 2:03 pm #

      oops type:

      Ferry was also #7, a power driven vessel.

      Not “wasn’t”

      • Terry December 8, 2016 at 7:26 am #

        Hmm. Interesting. But what about rule # 2? Would Nap Time fall under this rule since the operator was, shall we say, not in command?

        • andy December 8, 2016 at 7:43 am #

          No. Under definitions, Rule 3(f), not under command is defined as arising from”exceptional circumstances is unable to maneuver”.

          Nap tyme was still able to maneuver, if someone was looking out and there to turn the wheel. Nothing was broken or nonfunctional in its steering.

          Also I doubt anyone would successfully argue that using the head is a exceptional circumstance.

    • andy December 6, 2016 at 2:11 pm #

      Here is the link to the Colregs, Navigation Rules:

      http://www.navcen.uscg.gov/pdf/navrules/navrules.pdf

    • Al December 6, 2016 at 9:43 pm #

      Except the ferry is absolutely a vessel with limited ability to maneuver & therefore had right of way

    • QM1 December 7, 2016 at 8:06 am #

      You forgot however that the ferry was in fact actually restricted in her ability to maneuver based on the fact she was in fact in a Narrow channel. If you review the charts for where the collision occurred you will see that she was in fact in a narrow channel.

      • andy December 8, 2016 at 12:00 am #

        Dalco passage is not a narrow channel for a vessel the size of the ferry. The ferry would need to be showing the proper day shapes to claim privilege as a vessel restricted in her ability to maneuver. None of the ferries in Washington display such day shapes during normal operations.

        Please read the Colregs!

  11. ZonkerHarris December 6, 2016 at 11:46 am #

    Good weed, Nappy?

  12. Kristen December 6, 2016 at 8:19 am #

    “Commercial traffic ALWAYS has the right of way.” Page 15: http://www.boaterexam.com/usa/washington/washington_state_boating_rules_and_regulations.pdf

    I’m glad no one was hurt.

    • Dave philipp December 6, 2016 at 8:39 am #

      No, actually it doesn’t…there are many circumstances it does but to say always is incorrect.

    • andy December 6, 2016 at 1:16 pm #

      please read the bottom of page 14 which sets the conditions of where the statement you cite applies:

      The designated waters of the traffic lanes. Yes commercial traffic participating and traveling in a traffic lane does have right of way over vessels crossing the traffic lanes or not required to travel in the lanes. Note private vessels large enough to be required to participate in the traffic lanes would also have right of way over non participating vessels. Also Ferry traffic on the Tacoma to Vashon run does not travel in the traffic lanes so it does not have standing based on this Rule 10 of the Colregs.

      This is all spelled out in the Colregs. The navigation rules for boating are the governing rules to follow. The boater education materials interpret and try to explain these rules. Usually best to go to the source material.

    • Jill F Russell December 6, 2016 at 2:18 pm #

      Um, nope, not true. Absolutely nowhere in the International Regulations for the Prevention of Collisions at Sea (COLREGS) does it mention “commercial” vessels. And international / federal law on navigable waterways trumps WA regulations, despite the pdf.

    • QM1 December 7, 2016 at 8:07 am #

      Actually, that isn’t true. Coast Guard Inland rules apply. I recommend you read the rules of the road.

      • andy December 8, 2016 at 2:51 am #

        You are wrong, inland rules do not apply anywhere on Puget Sound. International rules apply.

  13. Robert Reeder December 6, 2016 at 5:12 am #

    Nap Tyme was not maintaining a proper lookout.

    Nap Tyme however was the stand-on vessel, not operating in a narrow channel or fairway or in a traffic separation scheme, in unlimited visibility.

    The ferry had time to sound five shorts but from the prop wash was not seen to be backing down until the moment of impact, or just moments before it.

    This looks very, very bad for the ferry driver.

  14. Mary-Margaret December 5, 2016 at 11:40 pm #

    Someone send Nap Tyme this book ..
    https://www.amazon.com/Avoid-Huge-Ships-John-Trimmer/dp/0870334336.

  15. Chris December 5, 2016 at 10:54 pm #

    Nap Tyme was the stand on vessel. The ferry needed to avoid her.

    Having said that, Nap Tyme had a duty to take evasive action when it became clear the ferry would not out could not take proper evasive action.

    Her captain was also clearly not giving adequate watch.

    So both captains are at fault in this one.

    • andy December 6, 2016 at 1:49 am #

      Totally agree.

    • Captain David Hagen December 6, 2016 at 6:33 am #

      what? Dude you need to read maritime law,

  16. Erik December 5, 2016 at 7:51 pm #

    Nap Thyme technically would be the stand-on vessel as the ferry was on his Port side, but the larger, commercial ferry overrides that protocol and is the Stand-on vessel and Nap Thyme should give way!

    • andy December 6, 2016 at 1:45 am #

      Where in the colregs is sized mentioned in regards to right of way?

      • Kristen December 6, 2016 at 8:32 am #

        Andy – the very top of page 15: http://www.boaterexam.com/usa/washington/washington_state_boating_rules_and_regulations.pdf

        Commercial traffic always has the right of way.

        • BM December 6, 2016 at 11:55 am #

          Andy – the very top of page 15: http://www.boaterexam.com/usa/washington/washington_state_boating_rules_and_regulations.pdf

          Commercial traffic always has the right of way.

          Well, that would be for a traffic separation zone and not applicable in this case.

        • andy December 6, 2016 at 2:09 pm #

          please read the bottom of page 14 which sets the conditions of where the statement you cite applies:
          The designated waters of the traffic lanes. Yes commercial traffic participating and traveling in a traffic lane does have right of way over vessels crossing the traffic lanes or not required to travel in the lanes. Note private vessels large enough to be required to participate in the traffic lanes would also have right of way over non participating vessels. Also Ferry traffic on the Tacoma to Vashon run does not travel in the traffic lanes so it does not have standing based on this Rule 10 of the Colregs.
          This is all spelled out in the Colregs. The navigation rules for boating are the governing rules to follow. The boater education materials interpret and try to explain these rules. Usually best to go to the source material.

  17. Saul December 5, 2016 at 7:38 pm #

    OK I am going with singlehanded with autopilot while focused on another task.

    • Clarke Swanson December 5, 2016 at 10:09 pm #

      You don’t know what happened unless you were there. I am the one that go hit. I didn’t see him. That was my mistake. I have been in auto accidents but that is the hardest I have ever been hit. Everything on this boat ended up on the floor. Every cabinet, closet, cupboard, light fixture, furniture, tv, directv box, internet modem, electronic items, i.e. radar, gps, radio, stereo, tools, tool boxes, and everything else that was above floor level. It will cost me but I am alive and no diesel was spilled. That was the main concern of the USCG.

      • Wil Sail December 6, 2016 at 8:49 am #

        You sir are the fool. These waterways are constantly cross by ferrys. Count your lucky stars that you weren’t sunk in the process. How could you not see or hear a vessel that is 10 times larger than yours. Smh!

      • TwoLegged December 6, 2016 at 9:32 am #

        In broad daylight, on open water, in flat seas with little wind and no mist, rain or fog to obscure visibility … you didn’t see a ferry hundreds of time your size?

        Do you have eyes? Or radar? Or AIS? Or ears to hear the ferry’s horn?

        Are you aware of Colregs #5?

        This time you got hit by a bigger boat, and you were lucky to escape with your life. But your negligence could just as easily have led to your boat hitting someone in a smaller boat, causing serious injury or loss of life.

        So quit whining about your spilt cabinets …. and stay away from boats until you are committed to looking where you are going.

      • Remickulous December 6, 2016 at 10:03 am #

        You’re a brave man for admitting to this incident. No one intends to do something like this, and you survived a very dangerous “lesson learned”. I hope you are able to recover from this, and become a better boater as a result. Good luck!

  18. E Mags December 5, 2016 at 7:23 pm #

    Whether privileged (ferry boat) or burdened (Nap Tyme), it is the duty of every vessel – commercial and private, power and under sail – to avoid collision. The ferry boat captain should’ve reversed sooner to avoid collision and safety of passengers. Clearly Nap Tyme wasn’t going to yield.

    • QM1 December 7, 2016 at 8:20 am #

      Having been in the US Navy for 20 years as a QM, I can tell you based on the length of the ferry that she was already reversing when she sounded the danger signal, it does take that long for the prop was to push all the way to the bow of the ship. And she had already slowed significantly prior to the collision. That Ferry can’t stop on a dime. From the video she was doing between 5-8 knots when she sounded the signal, that means it would have taken her about 800 yards to come to a complete stop, if she had just stopped her shaft. With a backing bell slowing her she still would have had forward momentum that would have taken her at least 300 yards. As for the Capt of Nap Tyme, he violated several regulations, the major one not having a lookout stationed at all times. He left the helm unattended in a busy channel, disregarded the danger signal because he wasn’t paying attention, And after looking at the chart for that area and the depth of the channel, he failed to provide the right of way to a vessel restrained by her draft. After looking up the ferry, she drafts 18 feet, not 11 as previously stated. And where the collision occurred they were in the channel with shoaling waters 50 yards off her stbd bow and 240 yards behind her (approx). She couldn’t turn to port because she would have collided, she couldn’t turn to stbd, because she would have collided. She just doesn’t turn that fast. Nap Tyme was coming out of a side channel as indicated by the buoy seen in the video.

      • andy December 8, 2016 at 1:31 am #

        Quick reply…

        Totally agree Nap tyme did not maintain a proper watch.

        Draft is 11 feet on both Washington state ferry web site and Wikipedia.

        What buoy dif you see? Nap tyme was heading south, and ferry was heading towards Vashon. You can see the ferry dock in the background of the video. If there is depth to dock, should be room for it to maneuver.

        Washington ferries have props at both ends. As such the prop wash does not have to travel 250 feet to the bow only about 20-30 feet!

  19. James Alberding December 5, 2016 at 4:34 pm #

    How great would it be if they were napping!? Yikes!

  20. Pat December 5, 2016 at 4:08 pm #

    Was the coast guard called?

    • David Geller December 5, 2016 at 8:30 pm #

      Yes – Coast Guard was involved and was required to clear both boats for safe operation after the accident. It delayed the ferry about 30 min., according to the article.

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